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Category:Science and technology
July 27, 2019

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  • 5 May 2019: Scientific study suggests dinosaurs flapped their wings as they ran
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  • 11 April 2019: New studies may bring slug-made glues closer to use in medicine
  • 5 March 2019: SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule docks with International Space Station
  • 23 February 2019: Zebra stripes may ‘dazzle’ pathogen-packing horse flies, say scientists
  • 11 February 2019: Pioneering oceanographer Walter Munk dies of pneumonia in California
  • 27 January 2019: Male Magellanic penguins pine for pairings: Wikinews interviews biologist Natasha Gownaris
  • 26 January 2019: US study finds correlation between youth suicide, household gun ownership
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  • 12 January 2019: Scientists report correlation between locations of Easter Island statues and water resources
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Forest preservation plan debated at climate talks
July 27, 2019

Saturday, December 8, 2007

Delegates at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Indonesia are wrestling with a proposal that would allow developing nations to earn billions of dollars through carbon trading by leaving idle forests such as those in Borneo, the Amazon and Congo basins.

The news comes on the same day that it was announced that forest clearance in the Amazon Rainforest was falling compared to previous years.

Delegates from about 190 countries are negotiating a plan for private companies and wealthy nations to pay poorer nations to keep their forest intact. It is called the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation in Developing Countries, or REDD proposal.

Environmental scientists say tree cutting in tropical areas accounts for about 20 percent of all man-made carbon dioxide emissions blamed for global warming. Tropical forests soak up vast amounts of carbon dioxide; burning timber to clear land releases it.

Marcelo Furtado with Greenpeace in Brazil says the REDD plan is needed to fill gaps in the current Kyoto Protocol, an international agreement to limit emissions of greenhouse gases which does not include ways to preserve forests.

“We would like to see, at the very least, a REDD mechanism moving forward, because we want to see countries taking action now. We don’t want to wait to 2013 to start seeing this action taking place. And this is something this convention, this group of countries could deliver,” said Furtado.

Frances Seymour, Director General for the Indonesia-based Center for International Forest Research, is concerned a premature REDD agreement could do more harm than good.

“Because in many forested countries, land tenure rights to forest lands and resources are either unclear or contested or both. And you can imagine that if a potential new income stream is available for those who can present themselves as owners of the forest, this could create conflict and create conditions under which some of the world’s poorest people, who are people who live in forests, could be pushed aside,” said Seymour.

Financial analysts are also cautious about the proposal.

Charlotte Streck, the director of Climate Focus, a Rotterdam-based consultancy, said investors are worried about how governments would monitor their forests and ensure the carbon stored in them remains intact.

“This is what makes the private sector nervous, because these are risks that they cannot hedge properly, and that they cannot evaluate in the same manner as the project related risks,” she said.

Conference delegates are still debating how to monitor the world’s remaining tropical forests, how to stop logging in one place without shifting the problem to another area, and how to estimate the amount of carbon in a piece of land.

Yvo de Boer, the U.N.’s climate change chief, said a REDD agreement is unlikely during this conference, but a group working on the details is making significant progress.

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UEFA Cup 2007–08: Red Star Belgrade vs. Bayern Munich

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UEFA Cup 2007–08: Red Star Belgrade vs. Bayern Munich
July 5, 2019

Thursday, October 25, 2007

October 25, 200721:15 (UTC+1)
Red Star Belgrade 2–3 Bayern Munich Stadion Crvena Zvezda, Belgrade Attendance: 41,000 Referee: Matteo Simone Trefeloni
Koroman 16′ (1)Basta 46’Bajalica 46’Uribe 64’Barcos 69’Burzanovi? 69’Milijaš 74′ (1)Milijaš 75’Bajalica 89′ Match Report 20′ (1) Klose 58′ Lahm 71′ Altintop 71′ Schlaudraff 81′ van Bommel 81′ Kroos 85′ Jansen 86′ (2) Klose 90’+4′ (1) Kroos

Bayern Munich beat Red Star Belgrade 3-2 on the last kick of the game on 17-year-old Toni Kroos’ 1st professional goal. Toni Kroos played a key role as he also assisted on Miroslav Klose’s 2nd equalizer only minutes earlier.

Red Star Belgrade opened the scoring in the 16th minute while Miroslav Klose 1st equalizer 4 minutes later. Red Star Belgrade took the lead again when Michael Rensing couldn’t handle a long distance shot.

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John Constable painting location mystery solved after 195 years

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John Constable painting location mystery solved after 195 years
July 1, 2019

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

The mystery of the location of a viewpoint used by English painter John Constable has been solved, after nearly 200 years. The Stour Valley and Dedham Church was painted in Suffolk, England, between 1814 and 1815, but changes to the landscape meant that the spot he chose was not known, despite the best efforts of historians and art experts.

Now the puzzle has been answered. Martin Atkinson, who works for the National Trust as property manager for East Suffolk, used clues from the painting and looked at old maps to track down the viewpoint. Trees had grown, a hedgerow had been planted and boundaries had moved or disappeared, but Atkinson eventually worked out where Constable had stood. He said, “When I discovered that I had worked out the location where Constable painted this particular masterpiece, I couldn’t believe it. All the pieces of the jigsaw finally fitted together.”

Atkinson used an 1817 map of East Bergholt, where Constable grew up, as a reference point, but found that the view would have changed not long after the painting was completed. “The foreground didn’t fit at all, it was quite unusual as we know Constable painted it in the open air so he would have been standing in the scene. The hedgerow in his work no longer exists and there’s another hedgerow that runs across the scene today which wasn’t there. When you stand on the road on which he would have stood, and use the oak tree as a reference point, you see the same view. It’s great to see where an old master stood – and be inspired by the same view,” he said.

Suffolk, where Constable painted many of his finest paintings, is often called “Constable country”. Most, but not all, of the locations that Constable depicted are known. The picture is now housed in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts.

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